Carnival Chronicles 2016 Part 1

This is your ultimate guide to surviving, yes I said surviving, UWI CHTM Carnival 2016. Whether you’re a carnival baby or it’s your first time, it is guaranteed that you will have an amazing time! You don’t want to miss this!

Are you ready?
Are you ready?

What you will want to do:

Get in shape – being prepared in advance is always good. Carnival is a high energy and stamina event. If you intend on surviving through all the parties leading up to and after it, getting in shape is suggested. It’s not too late; gym, jog, do whatever you need to do to be ready. “Iz fete afta fete afta fete afta fete!”

Get in shape!
Get in shape!

Have a hearty breakfast on Carnival morning and allow appropriate time for digestion – nobody wants to faint at the side of the road or be bent over vomiting on the sidewalk. Save yourself the embarrassment and eat on time.

Drink lots of fluids and stay hydrated

Get lots of sleep before the event

Wear comfortable shoes, it’s a long road!

Ready for the road!
Ready for the road!

Do you get sunburn easily? Hats, shades, sunscreen and stockings are your friends, keep them close.

Listen to SOCA! You cannot, I repeat, CANNOT go to carnival without knowing the hottest soca music. It is essential if you want to enjoy your carnival experience. What do I suggest? Private Ryan Soca Brainwash

Stay safe – this is the most important tip you will receive. Always be aware of your surroundings and stick to the designated areas for the events. Your safety is your priority. Ensure that you secure your personal belongings such as your wallets, money, cellphones etc. This is your responsibility. It is inevitable, there will be alcohol, drink within your limits.

Drink responsibly
Drink responsibly

By Samantha Seedath, BSc. Tourism Management 2016

Photography by Elizabeth Mackay © 2015

In Loving Memory of Ainsley O’Reilly

On Tuesday, February 16, 2016 former Head of Department of CHTM, Mr. Ainsworth (Ainsley) O’Reilly, passed away at Princess Margaret Hospital in the Bahamas at the age of 79.

Oreilly blue shirt

The CHTM family and entire UWI community extends condolences to his family, friends and colleagues.  Mr. O’Reilly is survived by his wife Ruth O’Reilly; his sister Mona; sons Sean and Ainsley; daughters in law Charmaine and Angela; nephew Mark; nieces Joanne and Clare; grandchildren Christa, Charlotte, Andrew, Joshua and Madeline; extended family, friends, former students and colleagues at the University of the West Centre for Hotel and Tourism Management and fellow Kiwanians.

With Wife Ruth O'Reilly in 2001
With wife Ruth O’Reilly in 2001

Ainsley joined the UWI family in 1978 as a lecturer at the Centre for Hotel and Tourism Management. From 1981 to 1984 he served as Acting Director. In 1983 Mr. O’Reilly spearheaded the launch of the Tourism Management program at the Centre to create the dual programs CHTM is so well known for.  In 1986 Mr. O’Reilly was appointed Head of Department and served in that capacity until his retirement in 2001. Following retirement Mr. O’Reilly stayed on as a part-time lecturer in tourism until 2015. His career in education was a long and distinguished one and his contribution to the Caribbean tourism industry immeasurable.

Ainsley also made remarkable contributions to the community as a member of the Kiwanis Club of Nassau, serving as the Club’s 23rd president in 1984-1985; Secretary in 2004-2005, and Lieutenant Governor for Division 22 in 2006-2007 after which he was awarded the title Distinguished Lieutenant Governor with Excellence.

Photo credit Kiwanis Sunshine Club
Photo credit Kiwanis Sunshine Club

Mr. O’Reilly, there are so many  students and lives that you impacted in your over three decades at CHTM, we are all grateful for the lessons, the lectures, and the good times. It’s fair to say that we all left CHTM a little older and wiser and a lot stronger. We thank you for your years of service and dedication to education.

with student
With Tourism Management student, Class of 2003

March on. Do not tarry. To go forward is to move toward perfection. March on, and fear not the thorns, or the sharp stones on life’s path. ~Khalil Gibran

By Elizabeth Mackay, CHTM

Culturama 2016

Everyone was up bright and early, it was time to peel those potatoes and dice those onions because February 10th had arrived and it was CULTURAMA Day.  Yes, one of the most anticipated events of the year was finally here. We were all excited not just because we got to enjoy the full day off from classes but everyone knows if there is food dishing out…. Caribbean people dere’.

Culturama was hosted for its 24th time and this year was no different than the others. With CHTM being a melting pot of Caribbean nationals, this is the time we all get to come together to showcase and share the different aspects of our various cultures. But most importantly, this is the chance everyone gets to rep their respective country. There was surely not a shortage of students wearing yellow, green and black, as the Jamaicans came out to shine. The food was delicious, however, there was a shortage of Trini roti which was the crowd’s favorite dish and went like hotcakes. Among the other food and drink options was jerk chicken and festival, pepper pot, conch salad, pineapple tarts, sweet bread, fish cakes, St. Lucian rum and Bahamian Junkanoo punch just to name a few.

The day was filled with fun and laughter as we learnt (while eating) about the various dishes each country had to offer. Oh, of course there wouldn’t be a Caribbean event without music full blast! We jammed to the vibes of old school Reggae, Soca and Dancehall and as the rhythm hit our souls, we couldn’t help but to ‘bus a wine’. The day eventually transitioned into the evening segment, everyone came together once again for a night of singing folk songs, dancing, socializing and a good ole game of cultural family feud.

As students, Culturama allows us all to gain a greater appreciation for each other, realizing that although we may have different cultural backgrounds, we still share many similar traditions, customs and beliefs. It reminds us that though separated by sea, we are truly still…. One Caribbean.

by Jaynell Newton (BSc. Tourism Management, 2016)

Photo by  Jaynell Newton Copyright 2016

Building on the Foundation of the Past

“In this great future, we can’t forget our past.” Bob Marley sang these iconic words in ‘No Woman No Cry’ so many years ago, impregnated with meaning that would ripple through his and many other generations to come. Today I don’t want to spend this time lamenting on a legend’s legacy, but rather spend these few brief moments to look at ourselves. What contribution are we making to the legacy that some of us only remember in the shortest month of the year?

Tupac Shakur said in ’Changes’ in 1998, “Let’s change the way we eat, let’s change the way we live and let’s change the way we treat each other” in this song he recounts his life and experiences where he felt that because of his melanin, he had been treated as a second class citizen. He earnestly hoped for a drastic change in the way we are viewed and treated.

The Future of the Caribbean
The Future of the Caribbean

With revolutionary thinking on the part of artists and writers and poets of our time why is it that we long so much for that ‘thug life’ or are so quick to identify ourselves with the struggle. Nas ‘drops knowledge’ in ‘I Can’ where he tackles topics such as getting your education, not getting caught up in vanity, knowing your responsibility and moving into the new roles we can infiltrate and take over.

Young, gifted and black
Young, gifted and black

Let us demand more from our black leaders, representatives, and ourselves. Let us focus on the real issues of life and not get caught up in the amusement of ‘Love and Hip Hop’, ‘Basketball Wives’ and ‘The Real Housewives of Atlanta’ and other shows that seek to amuse us. After all the word ‘amuse’ came from ‘amuser’, “the primary meaning was “deceive, cheat” by first occupying the attention.”

For far too long have we been amused and abused, “free yourself from mental slavery,” as Bob said and start thinking about your next big move. Not a get rich quick scheme but something of substance, of worth. Let’s challenge ourselves to be bigger, better and blacker than before.

By: Jourdain Lowe (BSc. Tourism Management 2016)

When The Cat’s Away

Whatever happened to the good old days when no teacher equaled no class or a light reading assignment? Long gone are the days when movies were purely recreational. Today the cat would be away and the mice will work all day. Well I guess movies for marks isn’t such bad deal.

The lecture was held in the CHTM Dining Room. Beforehand there were groups organized to tackle specific tasks such as the food drinks and of course the movie itself. It all became clear after seeing how everyone stuck to their tasks that we were a well oiled machine.

Breakfast buffet
Breakfast buffet

We prepared fruit snacks, sandwiches and other little finger foods and the juices ‘on fleek’. Everything was aligning itself perfectly. We setup the projector, loaded the movie and hit the lights. All that was left was to wait for a few stragglers to trickle in before the fun began. As usual all cell phones were turned off or on vibrate, we had no babies in the room thankfully and were ready to begin.

Breakfast sandwich
Breakfast sandwich

The movie called “Life and Debt” which would shed a little more light on things I’m sure most of us never considered in such detail. It was amazing to realize how much of an influence the International Monetary Fund (IMF) could have on a nation’s economy. In this case we watched Jamaica become subjected to the most economically destructive activity, we watched as fresh milk and produce became impossible to sell as they were out priced by foreign imports. We watched as the IMF placed ‘solutions’ on the table that would not help in the long term. We watched and watched and as we did our hearts broke a little.

At the end of the viewing it was clear to all those who still had both eye on the projector that we have to be a lot more careful of the things we agree to because one bad decision can lead to decades hardship and injustice for not only our people but the people of generations to come. We must also appreciate the struggles that our grandparents tell us about because sure we can say Jamaica is not the only country that has been touched by the struggles of cheap exports. The more we examine the issues that plague us we realize we are in this together, and that the struggle is real.

By: Jourdain Lowe (BSc. Tourism Management 2016)